Textured Black and White Knit Dress

Friday, October 31, 2014

 photo IMG_3338_zps4d784cd1.jpgSorry I look stupid in this picture, it's freezing outside now  of course (or at least was the day I posted this) so I don't want to take new ones. I'm the world's worst blogger, haha.

So here's a dress I just made. I fell in love with this fabric when I first found it but then I was on the fence about it once the dress was done. Don't you hate that? There's just something about it that reminds me of Cruella DeVille though. Ah! Not what I was going for at all. ha hey maybe that'd be a good Halloween costume? 

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I used the same pattern that I used for this dress from the Stylish Dress japanese sewing pattern book. I love this pattern, it's easy so there's not much you can do to screw up and the dress is just really easy and comfortable to wear, easy to slip on, etc. That's my kind of dress, especially during the school year when I just want something comfy and loose. 

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The only tweaks I made this time around were just adding some length (cut off too much last time, the original pattern is really long though) and made the silhouette more a-line. Oh I added sleeves! I forgot the original pattern didn't have that. 

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I really love the gold buttons down the front, I think the contrast with the black and white fabric looks cool. I used black elastic cording in place of the handmade bias that the pattern calls for (for the button fasteners) and I recommend that because it was a lot quicker. And I think it looks better personally. It was a beast to get the cording sewn in place though, that stuff doesn't want to stay pinned.


7 Sewing Tips for the Beginner

Tuesday, October 7, 2014

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The first sewing tips post I did can be found here.
Fair warning these are really random and all over the place. haha so bare with me here.

Tip #1. Iron pattern pieces flat before pinning them onto your fabric. It will make cutting them out so much easier! Just make sure that when you're ironing them you don't leave the iron on the paper for too long because paper obviously burns more easily than fabric. 

Tip #2. Almost every project goes through a phase where it looks really bad. My mom calls this the "ugly stage." I think that's pretty fitting. The important thing is to not give up at this point. I promise it will look better once the seams are finished and any fitting issues are fixed.

Tip #3. Take it step by step. I know it's easy to get intimidated by projects when you look at it as a whole, but when it comes down to it, sewing is just following directions. That's it! It's easy to get intimidated by the whole process, but take it one step at a time and you won't feel like you're getting in over your head.

Tip #4. You know these pens? You will split the cap each and every time you buy a new one. So do yourself a favor and buy about 10. ha seriously though, am I the only one who this happens to? Every. single. time.  

Tip #5. Hem your sleeves first, before you insert them into your shirt/dress. I promise it will make your life easier. (Then you don't have to worry about hemming them once they're attached to more fabric/weight/material that's easy to get twisted around the sewing machine.) I actually also like to hem the sleeves even before I sew them together into a circular shape. (It's harder to sew once it's in the shape of an actual sleeve because sometimes it's tricky to maneuver the tube shape around the sewing machine arm.) I've found it to be easier to get a good, clean hem to just finish the hem first and then sew the sleeve sides together.

Tip #6. Don't sew to save money. Wait what now? I know a lot of people aren't going to like this one. Heck isn't that why you sew in the first place? The reality is however that unfortunately most of the time sewing costs more money because of our sad mass-produced clothing era. Don't get me wrong, you can still save money sometimes (especially when shopping fabric/pattern sales!) but just don't go into it with the notion that you will (see what I did there? sewing joke. haha) 
(Edited to add: Check out Emily's post down below for some good tips on saving money!)

Tip #7. When making fabric-covered buttons, use books (or something hard) to press down on the button shank (to enclose the fabric around the back of the button.) That probably made no sense, I'm finding it hard to explain this one. ha I've just found that your fingers (and in my case, elbow!) will start to hurt and get tired really fast from pressing down on the buttons so hard. So I use books to fix that problem! If you are having a hard time understanding what I mean by this let me know and I can totally make a video showing it better. I'm not very good at explaining things.



That's all I've got! What are some tips and tricks you've found?

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